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As physical, occupational and speech therapists working with children with complex needs (and too often) exhausted families and disconnected teams that don't always see eye-to-eye, we recognised the need for clinical discussions that go beyond what we can gather from textbook and published guidelines.

An Eye-Opening Interview with Dr. Susan Barry on Neuroplasticity and Vision


A podcast header showing Dr Susan Barry, Professor Emeritus of Biological Science and Neuroscience about Developmental Optometery and Vision Recovery

Dr. Susan Barry

aka

Stereo Sue


When it comes to understanding how the work that we try to do every day in the clinic actually works, this interview with Dr. Susan Barry may be one of the most eye-opening interviews I have done so far - excuse the pun.


Dr. Barry is a a Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences, Professor Emeritus of Neuroscience and Behavior and (as she calls herself) a recovered Strabismic.


Her story of fixing her gaze which started at age 48 gives us unmatched insight how neuroplasticity can be harnessed in every day therapy to drive recovery.


We cover topics from the value of clinical wisdom and the cautionary tales of over interpreting published research to the importance of not being distracted by the obvious problems you see, but rather understanding the reason behind why you are seeing them to drive effective rehabilitation.


There’s so many nuggets to take away from this interview, you are going to love it - enjoy!

 

Scroll down to the podcast player to listen or find us on Spotify, iTunes or Stitcher.


For handy links to things we've discussed in this interview,  scroll down to the Resources Section at the bottom of the page.



Listen, enjoy, share...




Podcast Highlights

  • 01:57 minutes- Fixing my Gaze

  • 06:59 minutes- Habits hide recovery

  • 12:10 minutes- The overinterpretation of research

  • 15:35 minutes- Is there really a critical period

  • 26:34 minutes- The Just Right Challenge

  • 34:40 minutes- The impact of vision on development

  • 38:17 minutes- The cost of compensations

  • 43:06 minutes- Is it pseudoscience when it’s not mainstream practice?

  • 46:40 minutes- What you see is not the real problem

  • 52:25 minutes- Alignment, proprioception and habits


Questions

  • 57:45 minutes-Opthalmologists, Optometerists and Orthoptists

  • 1:03:08 minutes- Torticollis

  • 1:05:32 minutes- Cautionary tales for sugical interventions

  • 1:09:41 minutes- Prism glasses and toe-walking


  • 1:11:40 minutes- Vision myth busters

  • 1:13:17 minutes- Advice for therapists



Dr. Susan Barry


Mentioned  

  • Curtis Baxstrom

  • Oliver Sacks:

    • Neurologist and author who dubbed Dr. Barry "Stereo Sue" in a 2006 New Yorker article.

    • They shared a ten-year correspondence, detailed in Dr. Barry's book "Dear Oliver."

  • Theresa Ruggiero:

    • Developmental optometrist who helped Dr. Barry achieve stereovision through vision therapy.

    • Key figure in Dr. Barry's journey to gaining 3D vision.

  • Torsten Wiesel and David H. Hubel:

    • Pioneering neuroscientists whose work on critical periods in visual development was challenged by Dr. Barry's experiences.

    • Hubel specifically acknowledged the limitations of their research in fully understanding neuroplasticity.

  • Frederick W. Brock:

    • Developed the vision therapy techniques used by Dr. Barry.

    • His methods played a crucial role in her recovery of stereovision.

  • Daniel T. Barry:

    • Former astronaut and Dr. Barry's husband.

    • His support and encouragement were instrumental throughout her journey.



Essential Books​​ to guide your thinking on child led therapy and approaches






 

Please note: these book links go through to the Amazon Affiliate Program

Thanks for your support!

 


 Extras 


  1. Stereo Sue - The New Yorker Article by Oliver Sacks: The New Yorker

  2. TEDx Talk: TEDxPioneerValley - Sue Barry - Fixing My Gaze

3. A great lecture





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